Day By Day

Comments

  • Joel

    I would like to see the list womanly duties. Every one knows the list for men.

    • eon

      One said it better than any other;

      Katherine;

      “Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper,
      Thy head, thy sovereign, one that cares for thee,
      And for thy maintenance; commits his body
      To painful labor, both by sea and land;
      To watch the night in storms, the day in cold,
      Whilst thou li’st warm at home, secure and safe;
      And craves no other tribute at thy hands
      But love, fair looks, and true obedience-
      Too little payment for so great a debt.
      Such duty as the subject owes the prince,
      Even such a woman oweth to her husband;
      And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour,
      And no obedient to his honest will,
      What is she but a foul contending rebel,
      And graceless traitor to her loving lord?
      I asham’d that women are so simple
      ‘To offer war where they should kneel for peace,
      Or seek for rule, supremacy, and sway,
      When they are bound to serve, love, and obey.
      Why are our bodies soft, and weak, and smooth,
      Unapt to toil and trouble in the world,
      But that our soft conditions, and our hearts,
      Should well agree with our external parts?”

      -Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew

      No, a wife should not submit to abuse from a husband, no more should a child from a parent.

      But if all that is offered is love, support, companionship, and an honest need for same, ’tis wrong not to reply in kind. If that is what she truly seeks in her turn.

      If she does not want that accommodation, all she has to do is say “no” when he asks the first and most important question; “Will you do me the honor of becoming my wife?”

      The pain that causes will be less than what he would have if she were to say “yes” without the resolve to honor the bargain.

      Like freedom, marriage is also a two-edged sword. It can shield, or it can cut, both ways.

      I fear me we have forgotten that.

      clear ether

      eon

      • JTC

        eon,

        Shakespeare too was full of beautiful ideals…and ambiguity and frustration.

        But life is life, and a play is but a play, and ne’er the twain shall meet.

      • CAPT Mike

        Excellent contribution.
        Thanks

    • capn

      Joel,

      I, too, would like to see these rules laid out … in text.
      My problem is bandwidth and therefore cannot view videos.
      The small price I pay for living in the (very rural) country where I needn’t deal with the totally unnecessary woes of the Urban Environment.

  • Dan in MD

    Kinder, Kirke und Kichen sums it up best. Also praise for following the rules, comdenation for not following, and a sharp distinction between lady and not lady.
    A man’s home was his castle, but she ran it and he had best follow.

  • Blue Quasar

    Few seem to like the responsibility that comes with freedom.

    Fewer still seem to like the responsibility that comes with power.

    The modern solution seems to be to keep people immature for as long as possible.

    Chivalry was indeed a social system that put responsibilities on both men and women. The weakness of such a system was not only the Knowledge Problem (as put forth by Hayek) but also greed and envy. We’ve solved the Knowledge Problem (as much as possible) with the American form of the Democratic Republic but without a strong moral structure greed and envy continue to wreak havoc.

    • pool dog

      what you said….

  • JTC

    The code is only the code if both parties -man and woman, business partners, or any respectful relationship- know it and follow it, unsaid and unenforced. The minute it must be spoken or required, it is no longer a code, it is a tyranny. And that doesn’t work worth a shit with a good strong woman or a good honest partner. Better to just find another one.

    • B Woodman

      Sometimes, in that eternal dance of men and women, there will be questions that need to be asked so that little irritations can be cleared up before they become large impediments (latin; impedimentum, singular, key; impedimenta, plural, baggage).

  • Kafiroon

    I suspect the “code” our Constitution Law teaching President has comes from about 660AD in the mid-east.

  • H_B

    I am disinclined to acquiesce to your request…means “no”

  • Little-Acorn

    ‘The “Code” is more what you’d call “guidelines” than actual rules.’

    That line was also used in the first “Ghostbusters” movie, said by Bill Murray, wasn’t it?

  • Grape

    Code indeed. One is reminded of the Bushido Code.

  • Bill G

    Chivalry, from the Oxford Dictionary online presence –
    Chivalry: The combination of qualities expected of an ideal knight, especially courage, honor, courtesy, justice, and a readiness to help the weak.
    Origin: Middle English: from Old French chevalerie, from medieval Latin caballerius, from late Latin caballarius ‘horseman’ (see chevalier).
    Back then, the only horsemen were the nobility, and chivalry was a code that tried to get them to live and act honorably.
    Rather as the concept of ‘Common Courtesy’ tells us that we all should behave the same way.
    Of course, now that Political Correctness and it’s bastard child Social Justice are being enforced none of the above need apply.
    Bah, humbug.

  • Pamela

    Code, Rules or Guidelines. Some will follow, some will totally disregard; and then some, more than naught, will want to play both ends against everyone else.
    It will not turn out well for the players of hearts and darts games.

  • Kevin M

    OT: We lost Bowie last night.

    ZPG

    • OpenTheDoor

      Mother calls, but we don’t hear
      There’s lots more things to do
      It’s only 5 o’clock, and we’re not tired yet
      But we will be, very shortly

      Rest in Peace

    • JTC

      Ground Control to Maj. Tom:

      “May God’s love be with you (Two, One, Liftoff)”

    • Spin Drift

      I’ll always be a “Young American.”

      I was fortunate to see Mr. Bowie live. It was during the Glass Spiders tour. I was last row main floor. Prince and his entourage came in and set up a platform right behind me to watch the production. It was the best concert from an interactive with the audience perspective. Booms, bucket lifts, lasers, lights, pyrotechnics. Amazing show!

      Spin
      You only get one orbit Major Tom, make it memorable.

  • Kevin M

    Long live the Sovereign.

  • NotYetInACamp

    “Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be, Be one.”
    – Marcus Aurelius

    Add wo to man in that – bubba

  • Rey

    A perfect wife follows the most basic rules:

    She is a lady in the parlor;
    An intelligent, well studied woman who is a delight to all who have the privilege to know her. With a beauty that extends much deeper than her skin, she brings sunlight and happiness to all those whom she meets. She can hold a conversation, understands logical points, is never boisterous nor unkind and can offer sage advice when asked. She takes pride in her appearance, such as to tell the world; “See how well my husband keeps me”. She makes her husband shout at the world, “Behold the jewel that graces my home”

    A chef in the kitchen;
    She is the lady of her domain and a genius at culinary skills. She can prepare a meal for eight with a budget for two and all leave the table impressed. She is at her ease cooking for 2 or 200. She ensures the safety and well being of her family and makes her a personal goal to be healthy. She is thrifty with her husband’s resources , not because they are or are not of limited means but as an homage to the amount of her husband’s labor these resources represent. Her husband’s seat and blood she carefully spends.

    A whore in bed;
    A happy wench she is behind the closed doors of her bed chamber. She is always wiling and happy to please, not because her husband expects it but because it makes her happy. More than sex, she understands that a happy mattress is a nest where her marriage is kept well safeguarded. She does not bring the problems of the world to bed; her bed is her throne where she shares that which she shares with no other, she will not foul it with the outside worries.

    I have met only two women in my life who follow these rules. I am proud to share a home with one.

    • capn

      I have not as yet had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of such a woman but life is not over and I do hold out the hope ….

      Rey,

      I would swear that I have read that somewhere before. If it is a quote would you please share the author as I would love to put the two together in my “Quotes” collection.

      Thanks

      • Joseph P. Martino

        I am reminded of a joke told to the Squadron Officer School class back in 1957. It was used as an example of setting criteria for a decision. A man says that what he wants in a wife is for her to be a diplomat in the living room, an economist in the kitchen, and a tigress in the bedroom. Later, he is asked how it worked out. His reply: not so good. She turned out to be a tigress in the living room, a diplomat in the kitchen, and an economist in the bedroom.

    • JTC

      Rey,

      You are a fortunate man, as am I for lo, nigh 45 years now.

      I’ve always thought it possible to describe both of God’s assigned roles for His children simply and thusly: “Nurse and Nurture…Protect and Provide”.

      The thing is, some of those talents you mention might not blossom until a woman is a wife and a mother, or until a man has responsibility laid squarely on his shoulders. I know that my wife and I both grew into our jobs, having started out with incoming offspring at 17 we had no choice. Point being, as I implied in response to eon’s Shakespearean piece, one can wait too long or let rigid standards cause you to miss a fine woman who needs to learn and grown into her role. That caused me to remember a little poem of my own from some time ago wherein I somewhat ripped off both Shakespeare and Dowson…a reflection of hard learned lessons and some regrets at having not learned them sooner…and it does seem appropriate in the context under discussion here:

      http://poetnthepawnbroker.blogspot.com/2014/10/if-i-could.html?zx=47d354e821a47551

  • William Norton

    Re: “Migrants”

    Obama’s parting gift to Europe. He can say that now the West looks and believes like he does. A giant, living selfie.

  • Otto Didact

    Women wanted equality and they got it. Now they have to live with the consequences. If two guys go to lunch together, unless one of them states “my treat” it is expected that they will have separate tabs. If two guys go up to a door, neither is in any way obligated to hold the door open while the other enters first. He might, but he is in no way obligated. When they get to their table, each pulls out his own chair and sits down. No man EXPECTS another man to intervene if they get into a jam – he might but it entirely his choice. That’s equality. If I saw a woman being molested by a group of men and she was neither kith nor kin, I MIGHT feel constrained to intervene – IF I were armed. But I would feel no more obligated to intervene on her behalf than I would were she a man. Equality has its costs.

    • H_B

      If you ever want a woman to hate you, actually treat her equal. NO woman, no matter what words come out of their mouth, wants to be treated equal.

      Every single last woman on the face of the Earth wants to be treated SPECIAL. If you treat her equal she will feel awful about herself and despise you.

  • xdcpd085

    “Whenever women have insisted on absolute equality with men, they have invariably wound up on the dirty end of the stick. What they are and what they can do makes them superior to men, and their proper tactic is to demand special privileges, all the traffic will bear. They should never settle merely for equality. For women, “equality” is a disaster.”–Lazarus Long

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